David Martosko has been a Senior Strategist (and the Director of Research) at Berman and Company since 2001. Berman and Company is a public affairs outlet based in Washington, D.C. In this capacity, David Martosko leads a team among the boutique firm’s staff dedicated to planning strategic campaigns that integrate multimedia and online platforms.

In addition to these responsibilities, Martosko ensures the successful execution and completion of other projects, including the creation and revision of written material for print and broadcast advertising, white papers, Congressional testimony, press releases, presentations, and other mission-critical materials.

Over the course of his career, David has testified before both houses of Congress and lectured audiences in many foreign countries. Before coming to Berman and Company, David was a broadcast producer for ABC Radio’s WMAL-AM 630, Washington''s foremost political commentary and talk radio station. Working to bring shows on the air, David Martosko worked on all the logistical aspects of talk radio: securing guests for programs, screening calls, engineering broadcasts, and managing audio issues. But mostly, he was known as an adept researcher who could find just about anything on a moment's notice.

Like White House economist Jared Bernstein and former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, David Martosko originally aimed for a career in the arts. (Emanuel was a ballet dancer, and Bernstein studied double bass at the Manhattan School of Music.) Martosko graduated from Johns Hopkins University's Peabody Conservatory in 1995 with a Master's Degree in Music. His undergraduate degree is from Dartmouth College, where he originally matriculated to study physics and engineering. In addition to his BA in Music, Martosko obtained a teaching certification through the Education Department.

During his time at Dartmouth, David led the Dodecaphonics a cappella group, was the student conductor of the Glee Club, and composed “Dartmouth Heartsong,” the first new Dartmouth College song in several decades and the only one dedicated to (and sung by) Dartmouth's women.