Retired chemistry professor Ramachandra Hosmane joined the faculty of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County as an Assistant Professor in 1982 after completing his postdoctoral research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Dr. Hosmane’s research centers on biomedical technology, biomedicinal chemistry, and synthetic organic chemistry with biomedical applications. Two of his major research projects in progress focus on the development of artificial blood based on hemoglobin and the creation of new drugs to treat cancer and viral diseases such as AIDS, hepatitis B and C (HBV & HCV) and the West Nile virus.

A dedicated researcher, Ramachandra Hosmane has received over $10 million in grants since 1982 from organizations such as the American Heart Association, National Institutes of Health, the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, the National Science Foundation, and W.R. Grace & Co., a major chemical corporation. Recent grants have sponsored his studies on the inhibition of the hepatitis C virus as an HIV co-infection, the synthesis of various chemical substances, and the creation of artificial blood. Dr. Hosmane’s work has led to five US patents in addition to many other invention disclosures, one of which is for a medical diagnostic dye used in ophthalmologic surgery. Two of the patents are for antiviral compounds, one is on blood substitutes, one is on enhanced blood circulation, and the most recent one is for anti-cancer compounds.

Ramachandra Hosmane is the author and co-author of over 150 articles, including "Novel, Broad Spectrum Anti-Cancer Agents Containing the Tricyclic 5:7:5-Fused Diimidazodiazepine Ring System," which appeared in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters in 2011, and “A Novel Transition State Analogue Inhibitor of Guanase Based on Azepinomycin Ring Structure: Synthesis and Biochemical Assessment of Enzyme Inhibition,” which appeared in Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters in 2011. Additional articles by Ramachandra Hosmane have also recently appeared in Bioconjugate Chemistry, Structural Chemistry, and the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. Professor Hosmane frequently lectures on his work at conferences and symposia around the world. In 2002, he received the Maryland Chemist of the Year award from the American Chemical Society.