When the “fire” of technology meets the “watery” flux of nature, we often find ourselves situated in—or moving between—earth’s given waterways and more human-generated waterworks. And if it is true as Illich holds that “the twentieth century has transmogrified water into a fluid with which archetypal waters cannot be mixed,” then we must certainly seek to better understand these cultural and technological fluid dynamics in order to best meet our social, ecological and bodily needs. Even if we succeed in doing that, D. H. Lawrence may still retain the last word on the subject when he notes that “water is . . . hydrogen two parts, oxygen one, but there is also a third thing, that makes it water and nobody knows what it is