Stephen Plustwik

Student in Greensborough, Australia

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'It is notorious that many electors believe that the function of their member of Parliament is to ascertain, if he can, what a majority of his electors desire, and then plump for it in Parliament. A more stupid and humiliating conception of the function of a member of Parliament can hardly be imagined. [. . .] The true function of a member of Parliament is to serve his electors not only with his vote but with his intelligence. [. . .] If I have honestly and thoughtfully arrived at a certain conclusion on a public question and my electors disagree with me, my first duty is to endeavour to persuade them that my view is right. If I fail in this, my second duty will be to accept the electoral consequences and not to run away from them. Fear can never be a proper or useful ingredient in those mutual relations of respect and goodwill which ought to exist between the elector and the elected.'

—Sir Robert Gordon Menzies, in chapter 7: 'Freedom from Fear (continued)' of his _The Forgotten People_ (Redland Bay: Jeparit Press, 2017), 37, 38.

'The trades union movement has meant a great deal in our industrial history. It has represented collective bargaining. It has given strength to the workers as a group which no worker as an individual could have possessed. It has been an effective weapon against the obdurate or short-sighted employer. It has had supreme value in the working of the characteristically Australian system of compulsory industrial arbitration. As a servant of the wage-earner, unionism has done an extraordinarily good job of work. The movement for compulsory unionism breaks new ground. The trades union has been a splendid servant. It now aspires to be a master.'

—Sir Robert Gordon Menzies, in chapter 24: 'Compulsory Unionism' of his _The Forgotten People_ (Redland Bay: Jeparit Press, 2017), 125.

'The great race of men is that one in which each individual develops his fullest individuality, in which ambition is encouraged, in which there are rewards for the courageous and enterprising, in which there is no foolish doctrine of equality between the active and the idle, the intelligent and the dull, the frugal and the improvident.'

—Sir Robert Gordon Menzies, in chapter 21: 'Has Capitalism Failed?' of his _The Forgotten People_ (Redland Bay: Jeparit Press, 2017), 115.

  • Education
    • La Trobe University