Aaron Bouren

Aaron Bouren

In 1965, a brilliant psychology researcher named Bruce Tuckman constructed a theory about group development. He devised four crucial steps: Forming-storming-Norming-Performing. Mr. Aaron Bouren thinks this pattern is essential and explains the behavior of project groups and entrepreneurial teams. But, we are not here to lecture about the entire theory, but rather to grasp a solution to journey safely through one problematic step, Storming.

Forming a team in general is somewhat easy, such as picking drafts for a football team or finding coworkers for that venture project. The challenge forms after new people get acquainted and tasks start to be delegated as a functioning group. Different perspectives, personalities and workplace habits exhibit themselves as each worker starts doing what is necessary (or lack thereof) and everyone starts to build tension around the table. This gets in the way of completing the job at times but conflict is not always a bad thing.

For many the storming phase tends to leave setbacks due to members of the teams trying to avoid strife and conflict. There are two ways that work with such struggles: confrontation and compromise. Almost too often, the head of the group would try to disengage the conflict and settle everyone down. That may slow down the chaos, but it does not allow the full potential for the team to solve different problems and teach how to cooperate together. In theory, this would allow the group to be trapped and not move forward into Tuckman's "Norming" and "Performing" stages.