Nhan Nguyen

A study from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has identified for the first time changes in the metabolic activity of a cach tang can cho nguoi gay key brain region in patients successfully treated for depression with psychodynamic psychotherapy, suggesting a mechanism of action behind one of the most historically important and widely practiced forms of therapy. They also found evidence that pretreatment metabolism in a different brain structure might predict which patients are likely to respond to that form of therapy. Their report will appear in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics and has been issued online.

Considered to be a successor of Freudian analysis, psychodynamic psychotherapy focuses on how a patient's prior life experiences, particularly important relationships, influence their character and how they relate to others. Through exploration of a patient's past and current relationships - including the relationship with the therapist - therapy focuses on helping the patient gain insights that can change both mood and behavior.

"Psychodynamic psychotherapy might be considered the original form fucoidan thuoc tri ung thu of 'personalized medicine,' since it draws directly from a patient's unique experiences to shape the course of treatment," says Joshua Roffman, MD, MGH Department of Psychiatry, lead author of the report. "While it has been a core part of psychiatric training for decades and continues to be widely practiced, psychodynamic psychotherapy hasn't been studied as broadly as have other approaches for a number of reasons, including its greater subjectivity and treatment-by-treatment variability. We do know that psychodynamic treatments are effective for some patients, and this study examined whether differences in neural activity could predict which patients would complete the course of therapy and which would drop out, a common occurrence for any type of therapy."

The study enrolled 16 patients diagnosed with major depression for whom previous treatment with medication had not been successful. Prior to beginning the therapy program, participants received standardized assessments of their depression symptoms and of psychological mindedness - the capacity to recognize