Danielle Sinclair

Nottingham

Contact:
Room B33
Queen's Medical Centre
Nottingham
NG7 2UH
UK
ntxds3@nottingham.ac.uk

Biography

I am in the second year (2013-2014) of a full time PhD studentship within the School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Education

I have worked in the field of mental health and community work since graduating with a First class honours degree in Counselling and Therapeutic Studies from Leeds Metropolitan University in 2004. I specialise in working with young people in both the statutory and voluntary sector. I am also a qualified counsellor and has many years experience designing and delivering training in a variety of settings. This training has included designing BACP (British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy) CPD Endorsed Training in Working with People Affected by Eating Disorders, Mental Health Awareness Training and Body Image and Self Esteem sessions in schools.

Expertise Summary

First Class BSc Honours Degree in Counselling and Therapeutic Studies

Level 4 Diploma in Therapeutic Counselling

Areas of expertise: counselling psychology and counselling skills, eating difficulties and disorders, body image and self-esteem, Personality Disorders, self-harm and suicidal thoughts, working with young people

Funded by University of Nottingham

Teaching Summary

Areas of expertise: counselling psychology and counselling skills, eating difficulties and disorders, body image and self-esteem, Personality Disorders, self-harm and suicidal thoughts, working with… read more

Research Summary

There is increasing attention on young people’s health amidst concerns about their health related behaviours – such as diet/exercise. Little is known about the impact of this on young people; young men are particularly absent in this area of research.

Schools play an important part in the communication of ‘health’ to young people and also constitute a key forum for young peoples’ discursive representations and understandings of health and healthy bodies (Rich, 2010). Relatively little is known however, about how young people respond to this information – not just their assimilation of this, but how they may contest, resist and redefine this communication within the contexts of their everyday lives. Exploring the ways that young men contest, resist and redefine this information offers the opportunity to explore

  • Work
    • University of Nottingham PhD Studentship
  • Education
    • University of Nottingham