Stafford Williamson

on Earth

Stafford Williamson

on Earth

I was born at a very early age before I began this inevitable march toward death and a cold grave or a firey ashen heap from the crematorium.

I decided to begin what "about.me" calls my biography with a passage of my own creation that combines Steve Martin and Franz Kafka. It suits my mood at the moment. Having had a small success, and a stunning defeat all in the same week, it seems appropriate to mix comedy with nihilism.

If you look at the "headline" above "Tilt the World" it says. Does that leave you scratching your head wondering what that is about? Perhaps you will see the underlying optimism of my perpetual viewpoint. What I mean by expresion is not so much that I am changing the world in an earth shaking way (and believe me, as a long time California resident, I have seen some earth shattering moments) but that at every moment of every day, my thoughts and actions tilt the world, ever so slightly, but not completely imperceptibly toward being a better world, which is to say, a better place as evaluated from my point of view. What is that point of view?

The world, our world, is an extremely complex tangle of disperate threads, not woven together, but more felted together than any other kind of fabric.Threads are, both in life and by way of this analogy, tiny fibers, twisted together to form a longer thicker, more visible and somewhat consistent appearing entity that may find a good and noble use, sit centuries, millenia on a shelf, or form the bonds of bondage or a noose. A very interesting feature of most threads, other than man-made monofilaments like nylon, is that the fibers which make up a thread are actually bonded into the structure of the thread by wrapping the "end" of each fiber around the next fiber or intertwining it with several "next" fibers over such a long percentage of its length that the friction created along that set of surfaces they have in common is far greater than it would normally take to break the fiber itself, or stretch it out of the connection to the adjacent fibers. And yet we know that, in theory at least, any thread, any rope, and even any steel cable can be stessed to the point of breaking.

Even more obvious is the effect of constant friction on some part or parts of the thread. It is not uncommon for boats to break free of their moorings to go wandering about the world on their own. The mooring rope simply rubs back and forth, day in and day out, over the gunwale.

  • Work
    • I try to be of service to others
  • Education
    • MA Interdisciplinary Studies, Arizona State University, 2014